Selecting a Major

What types of majors are there?

A disciplinary major is a major in a traditional academic discipline. A student selecting a disciplinary major completes the number of credit hours in that field as specified by the program. At least half of the course credits in a major must be completed at Guilford.

An interdisciplinary major utilizes theoretical perspectives for analysis from more than one traditional academic discipline. A student selecting an interdisciplinary major completes the number of credit hours in courses specified by the program. Some interdisciplinary majors must also complete a second disciplinary major, resulting in a double major. At least half of the major must be completed at Guilford.

A double major consists of two distinct majors. A student must complete at least 32 discrete credits for each major, but courses may double count between the two majors. Also, to earn a double major, a student must complete all requirements for each of the two majors.

All Guilford College graduates are awarded one degree, though students may complete the requirements for more than one major by double majoring. When students have completed the requirements for more than one major, and those majors offer different degrees (A.B., B.S., B.M., B.F.A.), a student will select which degree will be awarded. Although each graduate is awarded only one degree, all majors completed by a student are listed on a student’s permanent academic transcript.

Note: for a student to earn their degree, the student must complete at least half of the major credit hour requirements at Guilford. This requirement applies to each major a student earns. The minimum grade to satisfy a major is a C- in each of the courses required for a major, unless otherwise specified for professional licensure. In order for credit/no credit courses to count toward a major, they must be explicitly designated as such in the Guilford College Catalog.

Exploring Majors

Selecting the right major is an important process in your college career. Our caring and professional staff of Guilford Guides assists students through this process regularly. We offer a variety of tools and resources designed to help you understand your own professional identity. We use these resources to guide our conversations with you as we explore options and formulate plans.

For students who have already selected a major, it is still important to visit us Guided Discovery and chat! The average adult will change careers more than four times over a lifetime. Discussions with a Guide can help students who have already declared a major better understand how that major fits into the post-college world.

We encourage all students to visit Guided Discovery throughout your time at Guilford! You can schedule an appointment with a Guide using your Navigate app or the Navigate website.

Below are some resources to help you explore major(s) on your own or with a Guilford Guide:

View/research information about our academic programs and contact faculty/staff.
View/research major/minor information, curriculum, and requirements.
You can browse major and career information and statistics within your Navigate student app or on the desktop website.
Create an account or login with your Guilford.edu email and take personality, values, interests, and workplace preference assessments and then view your career/major matches and data.
Scroll to the bottom of our main .edu page to find the link for WhatCanIDoWithThisMajor.com, a site to explore common majors/minors and areas to work within them.
Self-identify with Holland’s six career interest types and explore majors, careers, hobbies, and personality traits associated with each type.
Browse the different personality types or take the free test and reflect on what majors/careers may be a good fit for you.
Browse career areas and view statistics, in-depth descriptions, day-to-day duties, and education needed to help in researching majors you are interested in.
Browse career areas and view statistics, in-depth descriptions, day-to-day duties, and education needed to help in researching majors you are interested in.

Declaring or Changing Your Major

DECLARING YOUR MAJOR

If you already knew what you wanted to major in before coming to campus, then you already have a major on file. Be sure to double check with your Guide that your major is correct. 

If you were undeclared when you arrived on campus, but have since decided on a major, please use Navigate to schedule a time to meet with your Guide so that you can discuss your decision and your Guide can share relevant major-related resources with you, and get you major declared officially.

CHANGING YOUR MAJOR

If you have a major, but have decided to change it or to add a second major, please use Navigate to schedule a time to meet with your Guide so that you can share your decision and your Guide can talk through the implications of your decision(s) and make sure your new path is a good fit.

Minors

The Guilford curriculum features interdisciplinary and disciplinary minors that provide coherent plans of study for students with special interests apart from their majors or who wish to pursue further study related to the major. Minors normally consist of four courses.

Students must take at least 48 credit hours to meet this requirement: at least 32 discrete credits for the major and at least 16 discrete credits for the minor. The discrete credits counting in the major are not allowed to count in the minor and the discrete credits counting in the minor are not allowed to count in the major. In the case where a student wishes to use a single course to fulfill requirements for both a major and a minor, she or he may do so as long as the 48-hour minimum is maintained (this may require taking additional courses).

There are two restrictions on choosing a minor in relationship to majors: 1) Students cannot choose a minor that has the same name as their major. For example, English majors cannot choose an English minor. 2) Students cannot satisfy the minor requirement with a minor that has a note in its catalog description prohibiting students from combining this minor with their chosen major. For example, the forensic science minor description prohibits students from combining this minor with the forensic biology major.